Tag Archives: Pet care

Make-It Monday: Pet-hair squeegee

A few weeks ago, I posted a trick I’d found on Pinterest for removing pet hair from furniture using rubber gloves. It worked beautifully, but I needed something a little faster for treating floors. Enter another Pinterest idea: a squeegee.

Normally, we associate squeegees with cleaning windows, but the rubber blade that prevents streaks on glass also comes in handy for generating enough friction to grab dog or cat hair and pull it out of a carpet.

That pile of hair came out of a section of carpet that was maybe nine square feet. Ron had just run the vacuum two days earlier.
That pile of hair came out of a section of carpet that was maybe nine square feet. Ron had just run the vacuum two days earlier.

Our collie mix, Songdog, is one of the sweetest dogs on the entire planet. He is also one of the messiest, as he sheds constantly. I sweep the living room, and within the hour, I see another sable-colored hair tumbleweed or two sneaking under the couch. Song spends a lot of time in our home office. Ron vacuums in there every week, but the vacuum doesn’t pick up everything, and those guard hairs on Song’s back are just coarse and stiff enough to weave themselves into the carpet and stay there.

Ron ran the vacuum Thursday.

I tried the squeegee technique Saturday.

This is what it pulled out of the office carpet:

You could just about make a Pomeranian out of that.
You could just about make a Pomeranian out of that.

It took about 15 minutes of crawling around on my hands and knees, scraping the squeegee over the carpet by hand, to do the job, but the end result is a rug that looks (and is) much cleaner, and the blade fluffed up the yarn pretty nicely in the process.

I’m not likely to expend this much effort every weekend, but I’ll definitely use the squeegee before the next time I steam the carpets. Put this one down as another win for Pinterest.

Emily

Make-It Monday: Rubber glove pet-hair removal

When I bought my Marshmallow couch a few weeks ago, my only real misgiving was Walter. The world is Walter’s obstacle course, and he spent most of his time lying on the back of our old couch, looking out the window or supervising the goings-on in the living room, so with visions of snagged leather dancing in my head, I set about trying to create a more suitable perch for him.

Forty bucks later, I came home with 10 lbs. of birdseed and a carpet-covered perch just the right height for him to use for birdwatching. I hung a birdfeeder from the front porch, removed the bubble wrap from the window to give him an unimpeded view, and set the perch next to the window.

He was wary at first, but once he figured out how to jump up on it, we couldn’t have kept him off of his perch if we’d wanted to.

This is Walter's favorite perch. He sits and watches the birds at the feeder on the porch.
This is Walter’s favorite perch. He sits and watches the birds at the feeder on the porch.

Now our only problem is cleaning the hair off the carpeted surface. This cat sheds like — well, a cat — and it takes four or five layers of lint-roller tape to clean a perch the size of a notebook.

I’m not fond of wasting disposable materials at that rate, so I got on Pinterest to see how other pet owners had worked around this problem.

Rubber gloves, as it turns out, are great for removing pet hair from furniture. Put them on, rub your hands over the upholstered surface, and the friction does the rest. Two minutes of that treatment on Walter’s perch, and I came up with this:

Gross. (And as usual, Songdog couldn't resist photobombing.)
Gross. (And as usual, Songdog couldn’t resist photobombing.)

Five minutes later, the whole perch — top, base and scratching post — was clean. File this one under “Pinterest win.” (Now I just have to find an equally effective means of getting the dog hair out of the office carpet. I’ll be testing a technique for that soon, too.)

Emily