Category Archives: Folk Thursday

Folk Thursday: Orion

A couple of years ago, I made a passing reference to a lovely folk song called “Orion,” which I remembered singing in music class when I was a kid.

Ever since then, I’ve gotten several hits a week from people who were Googling the lyrics and hoping to find sheet music or a recording of the song, which is about the environment.

A few weeks ago, Jim Zimmerman, the man who wrote the song, posted a comment, expressing surprise and delight at the flurry of interest in his song and inviting people to e-mail him if they were interested in hearing it again.

We’ve been e-mailing back and forth a little bit since then, and the other day, Jim sent me a recording of himself performing the song, which he has graciously given me permission to post here, provided I include the following reminder:

“Orion” is copyright (C) James Zimmerman.

It was really cool of him to let me post the file online, so please be equally cool and respect his intellectual property rights, hey?

Now … without further ado … click here to hear “Orion.” The file is in Windows Media Player format.

Thanks, Jim. I think you just made an entire generation’s day. 🙂

Emily

Folk Thursday: Bonus track

It’s not Thursday, but my little sister called me this evening to tell me that she’d gotten out of bed on this Martin Luther King Jr. Day with this song stuck in her head. She thought it might make a good Folk Thursday offering. I liked it so much that I decided to post it today, while we’re all thinking about King’s legacy.

Not sure I agree with all of the slideshow creator’s selections (I don’t think I’d put Tupac Shakur and Princess Diana up there with Rosa Parks, Mother Teresa, and Gandhi) … but if the Ray Charles version of this song doesn’t tear your heart out, you probably don’t have one.

Let’s all honor Abraham, Martin and John by making some sparks in the dark this week.

Emily

Folk Thursday: Woody Guthrie

“Highway 66 is the main migrant road. 66 — the long concrete path across the country, waving gently up and down the map, from Mississippi to Bakersfield. 66 is the path of people in flight, refugees from dust and shrinking land, from the thunders of tractors and shrinking ownership, from the desert’s slow northward invasion, from the twisting winds that howl up out of Texas, from the floods that bring no richness to the land and steal what little richness is there. From all of these the people are in flight, and they come into 66 from the tributary side roads, from the wagon tracks and the rutted country roads. 66 is the mother road, the road of flight.”
— John Steinbeck