One of the perks

There are down sides to being a teacher in a public school, the three main ones being — to borrow a line from the late Warren Zevon — lawyers, guns, and money. If legal requirements aren’t tying your hands in one direction, security policies are tying your hands in another … and don’t even get me started on funding issues.

Throw in self-serving political maneuvering by people who have never set foot in a public-school classroom for anything more than a carefully scripted photo op; standardized test scores and all the attendant pressure and paranoia surrounding them; and the endless (and moronic) scapegoating of mythical “bad teachers” who are supposedly to blame for everything that’s wrong with public education, and … well, it’s almost enough to make a girl wonder why she ever let a certain smooth-talking little smartass coax her back into the profession in the first place.

Almost.

And then the girl in question runs across a student project from last semester that reminds her of exactly why she let said smartass talk her into said profession:

 

Precocious teenagers can’t fix everything, but their off-kilter sense of humor definitely makes the down side of working in the public sector easier to stomach.

Emily