Birds

I saw about a kajillion birds flying across Route 66 today as I was coming home from running some errands in Midtown. It was kind of awesome. That is all.

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4 Responses to Birds

  1. Raki Lee says:

    Cool!!! I love birds!!!
    Bees, I have a problem with, I have severe allergic reactions to bites.
    Now, they say we have a shortage of honey bees. I know where they
    have gone-My House!!! Is there a natural way to deter them???
    I need to have a bee-free zone out my door so I can go outside.
    I don’t want to hurt them, I just want them to go away a bit so I
    Can function. I’d really appreciate the help.
    Thanks,
    Raki Lee*

  2. If it’s a swarm, you can call a beekeeper to come and rescue it. (If it’s a swarm, you’ll know it — we’re talking about several thousand bees all clumped up on a branch or something, with others milling around in search of a home, and not just a few bees flying across your path.)

    If you just have several workers hanging around your door, watch them and see where they go. If they’re on your property, it’s because they’ve found a good source of something they need — probably either nectar or water. Follow them to the source, remove it, and they’ll go away.

    If you can’t find what’s attracting them, and they’re spending a lot of time right in your path, you can erect a simple screen out of T-posts and hardware cloth to discourage them from flying across your path. We have one in front of a hive next to our garden gate, and it works remarkably well.

    If these are really honeybees, you are not likely to be stung unless you disturb them. Move quietly and calmly when you encounter them, and wear a hat to keep them from getting tangled up in your hair. Under no circumstances should you swat at a bee, as this will only agitate it. Just treat them with respect and try to stay out of their way, and most of the time, they’ll do the same for you.

  3. Raki Lee says:

    Thanks! I think these are displaced worker bees looking for a queen.
    I’ll check your suggestions.

  4. Not likely. When a colony loses its queen, the workers simply carry on without her while they rear a replacement. Unless you’ve got a swarm (literally thousands of bees concentrated in one spot), you’re probably just looking at workers who have found a handy place to forage. A colony may have set up shop nearby, in which case you could be seeing normal traffic in and out of the hive. In such case, the easiest solution is to find the hive entrance and screen it so the bees have to fly well above your head to get in and out. A simple screen prevents a lot of unwanted encounters.

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